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Vegetarian recipes 2021 Best Veggie Book

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About the Book

Vegetarian recipes

Over 500 meat-free recipes to keep on your computer, phone, laptop or tablet for quick and easy reference. You will find a vegetarian recipe for just about any meal or occasion. Delve into this free recipe book and discover so many different ways to cook and present vegetarian food, many you will have never heard of!  With over 190 pages, this book is a must for your kitchen ebook library. Food categories include:


SOUPS

VEGETABLE DISHES

VEGETABLE COMBINATIONS

NUT DISHES

RICE, MACARONI, ETC.

CROQUETTES

TIMBALES AND PATTIES

SAUCES

EGG DISHES

CHEESE RECIPES

SALADS

SAVOURIES

SANDWICHES

HOT BREADS

PLUM PUDDING AND MINCE PIE


Excerpt:

VEGETABLE ‘FAT’ FOR FRYING

These recipes use the word ‘Fat’ because, as in the case of butter, fats are not aways in the form of oil. For ordinary frying use good butter or your favourite vegetable oil; for deep fat or hight-heat frying use a good brand of cooking-oil with a smoke-point that works well at high temperatures, like sunflower oil.

Steer clear of cooking with oils like Canola or Rapeseed Oil, which are the same product, made from Oil Seed Rape, which was originally unfit for us to consume; in fact in 1956 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banned rapeseed oil for human consumption due to high levels of toxic erucic acid.

It was then used only as a bio-diesel fuel to power engines (tractors!) Today, the plant has been genetically modified to remove some of the toxin : the EU still allows a percentage in most food products. Alarmingly, rapeseed oil is now used in just about every processed food on the planet: from infant formula (can you believe it?) to leading brands of mayonnaise (yes, you pay extra for whipped-up Canola/Rapeseed oil!)

The oil is currently the cheapest for food manufacturers to buy, which equates to more profit because the discount is not passed on to you, the consumer. Nature added an ingredient to warn us humans not to consume this plant, and now the food marketers call this oil “natural” and “healthy”.

But they would, wouldn’t they? The latest con is bottles of ‘Extra Virgin Rapeseed oil: they actually have the audacity to try and fleece the consumer by comparing this gunk to olive oil. At least in Canada and the United States the marketers branded it Canola (sounds pleasant doesn’t it?) however, in the UK it is idiotically branded, Rapeseed:

what a disgusting word! Image how victims of this monstrous assault feel when they read the word on almost every packet and can? Please share these points on social media to encourage debate because everyone has a right to know about what they are being forced to ingest … and to question why we were never told. Who’s in charge here, us or them?

SEASONING

The subject of seasoning is indeed holy ground in culinary matters, and after much thought and experiment I have decided that the phrase so deplored by young housekeepers, “season to taste,” is after all not the worst one to use.

No such inaccurate directions were to appear in this cook-book when planned, but I have finally decided with the army of wiser cooks who have preceded me that accurate measurements in seasoning are dangerous to success. Not only do tastes vary, but much depends on the time the seasoning is added, on the rapidity with which the food is cooking, etc.

With this in mind, and very long prejudice against the old phrase above mentioned, I have compromised and frequently been tempted to state quantities of salt and pepper, usually regretting when I have. The truth is, unless one can “season to taste” one cannot cook palatable dishes, and my final word on the subject is that it is well to always use a little more salt and pepper than seems advisable, and then just before serving add a little more!

source Obooko